Radioteletype (RTTY)

Radioteletype (RTTY) is a telecommunications system consisting originally of two or more electromechanical teleprinters in different locations, later superseded by personal computers (PCs) running software to emulate teleprinters, connected by radio rather than a wired link.

The term radioteletype is used to describe:

  • either the entire family of systems connecting two or more teleprinters or PCs using software to emulate teleprinters, over radio, regardless of alphabet, link system or modulation,
  • or specifically the original radioteletype system, sometime described as "Baudot".

History
Landline teleprinter operations began in 1849 when a circuit was put in service between Philadelphia and New York City. Émile Baudot designed a system using a five unit code in 1874 that is still in use today. Teleprinter system design was gradually improved until, at the beginning of World War II, it represented the principal distribution method used by the news services.

Radioteletype evolved from these earlier landline teleprinter operations.  Commercial RTTY systems were in active service between San Francisco and Honolulu as early as April 1932 The US Military used radioteletype in the 1930s and expanded this usage during World War II. The Navy called radioteletype RATT and the Army Signal Corps called radioteletype SCRT, an abbreviation of Single-Channel Radio Teletype. The Military used frequency shift keying technology and this technology proved very reliable even over long distances.

The German military successes at the start of the Second World War were helped by the wide use of mobile radio telex in the command tanks that allowed the fighting of combined weapons (tanks and Stuka dive-bombers used as flying artillery). The breaking of the German cipher used on the Enigma telex through the British Ultra programme had a devastating effect as a large portion of German strategic communications were run on radio telex.

From the 1980s teleprinters were replaced by computers running teleprinter emulation software.

Pronunciation
The pronunciation of RTTY is disputed
  • In very few applications, notably the U.S. military in WWII and the fifties, radio teletype is known by the acronym RATT (RAdio TeleType) rather than RTTY.
  • Some radio amateurs pronounce RTTY not by its initials but as "ritty".

Common RTTY Frequencies

Contests USA (kHz) USA (kHz) Europe/Africa (kHz) Japan (kHz)
Common Common DX frequency Common Common
1800 - 1810/1835 - 1845 1800 - 1810 1838 - 1843 1838 - 1843
3570 - 3600 3580 - 3600 3590 3580 - 3620 3520 - 3530
7025 - 7100 7025-7050/7080 - 7100 7040 7035 - 7045 7025 - 7040
10120 - 10150 10140 - 10150
14060 - 14120 14080 - 14100 14080 - 14100
18100 - 18110 18100 - 18110
21060 - 21150 21080 - 21100 21080 - 21120
24910 - 24930 24920 - 24930
28060 - 28150 28080 - 28100 28050 - 28150

To download the introduction and interface PC please clik: Introduction-1Introduction-2, Handbook and Interface Schematic
To download the software and user manual please click: MMTY & manualFldigi 3.23 & manualDM780 & manual.

Source :

  • http://aa5au.com/rtty/
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioteletype
  • http://n1mm.hamdocs.com/tiki-index.php?page=General+RTTY+and+PSK+Information
 

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